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Old July 20th 09, 11:11 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default HS1 Domestic trains are a bit busy

On Jul 19, 9:16*pm, wrote:
there is a London postal district. It
consists of all postcodes that begin NW, N, E, SE and SW.


Not exactly. There are also EC, W and WC.


....which reminds me: it's only since moving to an office in EC1 in
Islington that I realised there are EC postcodes that aren't in the
City. Are there any bits of the City that aren't in EC?

I know you can't expect the PO necessarily to keep up with boundaries
that were created years after its own creation, but bloody hell - were
they really too inept at the time of starting the London-post-district
system to try and stick vaguely to boundaries that had been defined
very clearly for over 500 years...?

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Old July 20th 09, 11:28 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default HS1 Domestic trains are a bit busy

On Mon, 20 Jul 2009, John B wrote:

On Jul 19, 9:16*pm, wrote:
there is a London postal district. It
consists of all postcodes that begin NW, N, E, SE and SW.


Not exactly. There are also EC, W and WC.


...which reminds me: it's only since moving to an office in EC1 in
Islington that I realised there are EC postcodes that aren't in the
City. Are there any bits of the City that aren't in EC?

I know you can't expect the PO necessarily to keep up with boundaries
that were created years after its own creation, but bloody hell - were
they really too inept at the time of starting the London-post-district
system to try and stick vaguely to boundaries that had been defined very
clearly for over 500 years...?


Why would they do that? Postcodes are about delivering letters, not
sticking to ancient boundaries.

tom

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THE POWER OF MATHS COMPELS YOU, THE POWER OF MATHS COMPELS YOU! -- Jon


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Old July 20th 09, 11:48 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default HS1 Domestic trains are a bit busy

John B wrote on 21 July 2009 00:11:34 ...
On Jul 19, 9:16 pm, wrote:
there is a London postal district. It
consists of all postcodes that begin NW, N, E, SE and SW.

Not exactly. There are also EC, W and WC.


...which reminds me: it's only since moving to an office in EC1 in
Islington that I realised there are EC postcodes that aren't in the
City. Are there any bits of the City that aren't in EC?


Yes, a few. For example, the London Silver Vaults in Chancery Lane are
at WC2A 1QT but are in the City. The area between Houndsditch and
Middlesex Street, e.g. Petticoat Square, is in the City but has an E1
postcode.

I know you can't expect the PO necessarily to keep up with boundaries
that were created years after its own creation, but bloody hell - were
they really too inept at the time of starting the London-post-district
system to try and stick vaguely to boundaries that had been defined
very clearly for over 500 years...?


They were establishing a system to improve the efficiency of their
business. Why should they stick to 500-year-old boundaries which no
longer reflected the expanded metropolis? More modern features such as
railways are often more important in defining natural distribution areas
than ancient boundaries.

--
Richard J.
(to email me, swap 'uk' and 'yon' in address)
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Old July 20th 09, 11:55 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default HS1 Domestic trains are a bit busy

On Jul 21, 12:28*am, Tom Anderson wrote:
On Mon, 20 Jul 2009, John B wrote:
On Jul 19, 9:16*pm, wrote:
there is a London postal district. It
consists of all postcodes that begin NW, N, E, SE and SW.


Not exactly. There are also EC, W and WC.


...which reminds me: it's only since moving to an office in EC1 in
Islington that I realised there are EC postcodes that aren't in the
City. Are there any bits of the City that aren't in EC?


I know you can't expect the PO necessarily to keep up with boundaries
that were created years after its own creation, but bloody hell - were
they really too inept at the time of starting the London-post-district
system to try and stick vaguely to boundaries that had been defined very
clearly for over 500 years...?


Why would they do that? Postcodes are about delivering letters, not
sticking to ancient boundaries.


'vaguely' was the wrong word above: they did stick *vaguely* to said
boundaries, just not *actually*. Had they done one or the other,
it'd've been fine - but creating an area that's 95% contiguous with
another area is bizarre.

(also, much as it pains me to admit it, the Post Office's status -
especially back when the London districts were created - means that it
does bestow some kind of geographical status on addresses. Life would
be easier if London postcodes were aligned to boroughs...)

--
John Band
john at johnband dot org
www.johnband.org
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Old July 21st 09, 01:23 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default HS1 Domestic trains are a bit busy

John B wrote:

I know you can't expect the PO necessarily to keep up with boundaries
that were created years after its own creation, but bloody hell - were
they really too inept at the time of starting the London-post-district
system to try and stick vaguely to boundaries that had been defined
very
clearly for over 500 years...?


Why would they do that? Postcodes are about delivering letters, not
sticking to ancient boundaries.


'vaguely' was the wrong word above: they did stick *vaguely* to said
boundaries, just not *actually*. Had they done one or the other,
it'd've been fine - but creating an area that's 95% contiguous with
another area is bizarre.


Yes but the City has expanded right up to the boundaries (which were
slightly modified in the 1990s) - it made sense to allocate the EC area in
terms of delivery, nothing more.

(also, much as it pains me to admit it, the Post Office's status -
especially back when the London districts were created - means that it
does bestow some kind of geographical status on addresses. Life would
be easier if London postcodes were aligned to boroughs...)


But in my experience it's only really in the London postal district where
this happens. Elsewhere you don't hear people using the post code as a short
hand for an area and they don't appear on street signs. I grew up in Epsom
and absolutely no-one there thinks of there being three distinct areas
called "KT17", "KT18" and "KT19" that divide up the town/borough/beyond.




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