London Transport (uk.transport.london) Discussion of all forms of transport in London.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 01:32 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jun 2007
Posts: 195
Default Class 378 in service

Yep there is one out and about - 378 005 - on the North London Line
although its first run started at Clapham Junction this morning. It
was on the 1157 from Richmond and should be the 1307 ex Stratford back
to Richmond. I saw it at Highbury & Islington but couldn't spare the
time for a ride on it. Looked very shiny and it certainly moves
quickly enough. Photos later although there are already shots by
others on Flickr.

--
Paul C
via Google

  #2   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 02:10 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 973
Default Class 378 in service

On 29 July, 13:32, Paul Corfield wrote:
Yep there is one out and about - 378 005 - on the North London Line
although its first run started at Clapham Junction this morning. It
was on the 1157 from Richmond and should be the 1307 ex Stratford back
to Richmond. *I saw it at Highbury & Islington but couldn't spare the
time for a ride on it. Looked very shiny and it certainly moves
quickly enough. Photos later although there are already shots by
others on Flickr.


I've managed to squeeze a one-stop ride into my lunch hour. The
gangway is much wider than I expected but the ceiling seems rather
low. The destination panels on the sides are too small and far apart
(and unreadble from an angle), and the motors seem a bit noisier than
on 377s. On the plus side, non-garbled next stop announcements.

U
  #3   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 07:27 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 162
Default Class 378 in service


"Paul Corfield" wrote:

Interesting that the guard has to travel in the train carriage, DLR
style, as the door release and door close buttons are by the doors
themselves.


Is it 'has to' or 'instructed to' I wonder? Generally, conductors on
Southern 377s work within the carriage, but I believe it is operationally
possible to work from the rear (or intermediate) cab, and I'm pretty sure
I've been on a few services (generally late night departures from Brighton)
where this has happened.

Also, are the guards actually releasing the doors? Just interested, as I
thought on most modern build units the driver did the releasing, and the
guard/conductor the closing.

Chris


  #4   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 07:48 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 400
Default Class 378 in service

Paul Corfield wrote:

Interesting that the guard has to travel in
the train carriage, DLR style, as the door release and door close
buttons are by the doors themselves.


I believe that this is merely an option... the LOROL guard I spoke to a
month ago told me that she would be hiding in the rear cab during both the
busiest and the most unsafe parts of her shift.


  #5   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 07:54 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Apr 2009
Posts: 40
Default Class 378 in service

"Chris Read" wrote in message
news

"Paul Corfield" wrote:

Interesting that the guard has to travel in the train carriage, DLR
style, as the door release and door close buttons are by the doors
themselves.


Is it 'has to' or 'instructed to' I wonder? Generally, conductors on
Southern 377s work within the carriage, but I believe it is operationally
possible to work from the rear (or intermediate) cab, and I'm pretty sure
I've been on a few services (generally late night departures from
Brighton) where this has happened.


Also possible that the service is DOO and there isn't a guard at all. Most
of the evening (post peak) Brighton Expresses run this way.

D A Stocks



  #6   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 08:01 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,188
Default Class 378 in service

On Wed, 29 Jul 2009, Paul Corfield wrote:

Interesting that the guard has to travel in the train carriage, DLR
style, as the door release and door close buttons are by the doors
themselves.


I was wondering about this a while ago - i can't remember if i asked here
or not. How does this work when the trains are crush-loaded? Is the guard
sardined in with his flock (school?)?

The fact one pair of doors is open while the guard shuts the others just
means people dash and plead with the guard to be allowed on - this
certainly happened with the lunchtime trip I saw at Highbury where there
is a constant stream of passengers.


I'm really confused by by this. Why is one pair of doors open while the
other isn't? What does 'pair' mean here?

tom

--
inspired by forty-rod whiskey
  #7   Report Post  
Old July 29th 09, 08:03 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 498
Default Class 378 in service

On Jul 29, 7:27*pm, "Chris Read" wrote:
"Paul Corfield" wrote:
Interesting that the guard has to travel in the train carriage, DLR
style, as the door release and door close buttons are by the doors
themselves.


Is it 'has to' or 'instructed to' I wonder? Generally, conductors on
Southern 377s work within the carriage, but I believe it is operationally
possible to work from the rear (or intermediate) cab, and I'm pretty sure
I've been on a few services (generally late night departures from Brighton)
where this has happened.

Also, are the guards actually releasing the doors? Just interested, as I
thought on most modern build units the driver did the releasing, and the
guard/conductor the closing.


Conductors certainly both open and close the doors on both London
Midland and on Southern services on the West Coast Mainline. On LM
services this is the reason for the delay between the train stopping
and the doors opening, as the conductor has to open the door where
they are and check the position and length of the train in relation to
the platform before opening the rest of the doors. For LM, where
selective door opening is used, only doors ahead of the conductor will
open. You can see this on the early morning services which call at
Wembley Central; e.g. the 8 car train on the 04.35 Milton Keynes -
Euston on Saturdays has an advertised stop here (in the on-line
journey planner, but not in the printed timetable) and only the front
4 coaches' doors open, with the conductor in the front cab of the rear
unit.
  #8   Report Post  
Old July 30th 09, 12:35 AM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,877
Default Class 378 in service

In article ,
(Paul Corfield) wrote:

the ceiling feels low compared to a 313


Flipping 'eck! I thought the 313s were already low enough!

--
Colin Rosenstiel
  #9   Report Post  
Old July 30th 09, 12:48 AM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Dec 2007
Posts: 44
Default Class 378 in service

On Jul 29, 7:27*pm, "Chris Read" wrote:
"Paul Corfield" wrote:
Interesting that the guard has to travel in the train carriage, DLR
style, as the door release and door close buttons are by the doors
themselves.


Is it 'has to' or 'instructed to' I wonder? Generally, conductors on
Southern 377s work within the carriage, but I believe it is operationally
possible to work from the rear (or intermediate) cab, and I'm pretty sure
I've been on a few services (generally late night departures from Brighton)
where this has happened.


At CLJ and ECR they will almost certainly be in an intermediate cab
during the peaks. It's generally advisable for late night west
coastway shifts.

Also, are the guards actually releasing the doors? Just interested, as I
thought on most modern build units the driver did the releasing, and the
guard/conductor the closing.


It's the driver on SN. Saves a lot of time over a long journey with
many stops. Over on SWT station stops seem to take an eternity in
comparison.
  #10   Report Post  
Old July 30th 09, 10:39 AM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jul 2009
Posts: 2
Default Class 378 in service

Andy wrote:
On Jul 29, 7:27 pm, "Chris Read" wrote:
"Paul Corfield" wrote:
Interesting that the guard has to travel in the train carriage, DLR
style, as the door release and door close buttons are by the doors
themselves.

Is it 'has to' or 'instructed to' I wonder? Generally, conductors on
Southern 377s work within the carriage, but I believe it is operationally
possible to work from the rear (or intermediate) cab, and I'm pretty sure
I've been on a few services (generally late night departures from Brighton)
where this has happened.

Also, are the guards actually releasing the doors? Just interested, as I
thought on most modern build units the driver did the releasing, and the
guard/conductor the closing.


Conductors certainly both open and close the doors on both London
Midland and on Southern services on the West Coast Mainline. On LM
services this is the reason for the delay between the train stopping
and the doors opening, as the conductor has to open the door where
they are and check the position and length of the train in relation to
the platform before opening the rest of the doors. For LM, where
selective door opening is used, only doors ahead of the conductor will
open. You can see this on the early morning services which call at
Wembley Central; e.g. the 8 car train on the 04.35 Milton Keynes -
Euston on Saturdays has an advertised stop here (in the on-line
journey planner, but not in the printed timetable) and only the front
4 coaches' doors open, with the conductor in the front cab of the rear
unit.


There was one sitting at Platform 18 at Euston on Tuesday morning. I was
off to see what state the NXEA dogboxes had come to by visiting Bury St
Edmunds. (Filthy dogbox from Cambridge as usual - a 156 turned up for
the return journey). Was impressed by the quick door release on the 365
at Kings Cross - unlike the usual long wait on a London Midland 321 or
350.

G


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Last class 378 goes 5 car eastender[_5_] London Transport 2 February 16th 16 11:00 PM
Class 378 Capitalstars, two years later TheOneKEA London Transport 11 June 8th 11 07:09 PM
The vocabulary of a Class 378 martin London Transport 3 June 12th 10 07:56 PM
Class 378/2 at Haggerston Dr. Sunil London Transport 5 May 28th 10 03:23 PM
New platform markings for class 378 at Shepherd's Bush Andy London Transport 1 June 8th 09 01:57 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:25 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 London Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about London Transport"

 

Copyright © 2017