London Transport (uk.transport.london) Discussion of all forms of transport in London.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31   Report Post  
Old January 25th 19, 08:34 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jan 2019
Posts: 1
Default When the software meets the hardware

On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 20:22:39 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 19:31:06 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:


Toilets don't need to be software controlled in the first place. Only teams


trying to justify their jobs would make them so.



It could be controlled by a box of relays, I suppose, but it wouldn’t


Why does it need even that? A purely mechanical flush would work fine. Its
not as if the train is doing barrel rolls.


The vacuum flush saves water and retention tank capacity and allows the
train to run a whole day (or maybe two, for those which outstable) without
tanking;


How delightful. A mobile sewage farm.

Why is fault reporting required?


So that Hitachi can be notified that there’s a problem and send a fitter
out; or at the very least see a pattern of recurring faults and investigate
the underlying fault, rather than just press the reset button every night.
(Whether these things actually happen is another matter!)


So the toilets are complex so that when a fault occurs due to their complexity
a technician can be notified? Calling Mr Heller....

On 800s the smaller toilets with the manual doors which therefore can’t
lock themselves out of use, generally get filled to the brim with ****
before people stop using them.

HSTs and 323s, however, I’ve seen clogged and blocked to the brim with
excrement and paper, which (a) stinks (b) is difficult to clean (for HSTs
it requires an extra shunt to the siding with the flushing apron and
application of hosepipe to either end of the pipe until it’s cleared; that
could be the difference between several sets leaving depot on time in the
morning or not).


Perhaps install more toilets in stations and get rid of them on trains
altogether. We're a small island, there are no journeys really long enough to
make them worthwhile except maybe the overnight sleeper to scotland but thats
not a commuter train.

Not everything needs to be computerised or have some sort of monitoring

system
built in.


No, but if it can predict faults before they occur (eg, that door/set of
points is taking longer and longer to move, send someone to check it out)
then that’s an advantage, surely?


Only if that outweighs the disadvantages of the toilet not working half the
time because of its complexity.


  #33   Report Post  
Old January 26th 19, 08:52 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 190
Default When the software meets the hardware

wrote:
On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 20:22:39 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 19:31:06 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:


Toilets don't need to be software controlled in the first place. Only teams


trying to justify their jobs would make them so.



It could be controlled by a box of relays, I suppose, but it wouldn’t

Why does it need even that? A purely mechanical flush would work fine. Its
not as if the train is doing barrel rolls.


The vacuum flush saves water and retention tank capacity and allows the
train to run a whole day (or maybe two, for those which outstable) without
tanking;


How delightful. A mobile sewage farm.


The alternative is for the entire railway to be the sewage farm.

Why is fault reporting required?


So that Hitachi can be notified that there’s a problem and send a fitter
out; or at the very least see a pattern of recurring faults and investigate
the underlying fault, rather than just press the reset button every night.
(Whether these things actually happen is another matter!)


So the toilets are complex so that when a fault occurs due to their complexity
a technician can be notified? Calling Mr Heller....


Conventional toilets get blocked too. Conventional toilet door locks fail
too. Conventional toilets run out of water too...

On 800s the smaller toilets with the manual doors which therefore can’t
lock themselves out of use, generally get filled to the brim with ****
before people stop using them.

HSTs and 323s, however, I’ve seen clogged and blocked to the brim with
excrement and paper, which (a) stinks (b) is difficult to clean (for HSTs
it requires an extra shunt to the siding with the flushing apron and
application of hosepipe to either end of the pipe until it’s cleared; that
could be the difference between several sets leaving depot on time in the
morning or not).


Perhaps install more toilets in stations and get rid of them on trains
altogether. We're a small island, there are no journeys really long enough to
make them worthwhile except maybe the overnight sleeper to scotland but thats
not a commuter train.


People travelling 5h30 from Paddington to Penzance might disagree.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
  #34   Report Post  
Old January 26th 19, 06:27 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jan 2019
Posts: 1
Default When the software meets the hardware

On Sat, 26 Jan 2019 09:52:16 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 20:22:39 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
The vacuum flush saves water and retention tank capacity and allows the
train to run a whole day (or maybe two, for those which outstable) without
tanking;


How delightful. A mobile sewage farm.


The alternative is for the entire railway to be the sewage farm.


I meant in the sense of them no necessarily being emptied every night.

So the toilets are complex so that when a fault occurs due to their

complexity
a technician can be notified? Calling Mr Heller....


Conventional toilets get blocked too. Conventional toilet door locks fail
too. Conventional toilets run out of water too...


I can't remember the last time the toilets in my office failed never mind
my house. As for the locks failing, who the hell cares? Keep it shut with your
foot.

Perhaps install more toilets in stations and get rid of them on trains
altogether. We're a small island, there are no journeys really long enough to


make them worthwhile except maybe the overnight sleeper to scotland but thats


not a commuter train.


People travelling 5h30 from Paddington to Penzance might disagree.


Possibly, but those sort of journeys are probably 1 in 1000. There's little
reason to have toilets on most multiple units IMO, certainly not something
like Thameslink where the average journey is probably 45 mins.

  #35   Report Post  
Old January 26th 19, 09:20 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 190
Default When the software meets the hardware

wrote:
On Sat, 26 Jan 2019 09:52:16 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 20:22:39 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
The vacuum flush saves water and retention tank capacity and allows the
train to run a whole day (or maybe two, for those which outstable) without
tanking;

How delightful. A mobile sewage farm.


The alternative is for the entire railway to be the sewage farm.


I meant in the sense of them no necessarily being emptied every night.


How else would you deal with the sets which outstable at Hereford,
Worcester and Exeter?

So the toilets are complex so that when a fault occurs due to their

complexity
a technician can be notified? Calling Mr Heller....


Conventional toilets get blocked too. Conventional toilet door locks fail
too. Conventional toilets run out of water too...


I can't remember the last time the toilets in my office failed never mind
my house. As for the locks failing, who the hell cares? Keep it shut with your
foot.


How does that work with a sliding door, a wheelchair user, or even a
non-wheelchair user in the accessible toilets where the door is too far
away? Or the occasional station toilet cubicle where the door opens
outwards...

The toilets in your house presumably aren’t used as intensively as train
ones? Over the years I’ve known domestic toilets get blocked, flush broken,
flushes which only work with a certain technique, multiple flushes needed
to actually clear the bowl... Mess room toilets which perhaps approach
train toilet frequency of use, get blocked often enough that people add the
word 'again' when they talk about it...

Perhaps install more toilets in stations and get rid of them on trains
altogether. We're a small island, there are no journeys really long enough to


make them worthwhile except maybe the overnight sleeper to scotland but thats


not a commuter train.


People travelling 5h30 from Paddington to Penzance might disagree.


Possibly, but those sort of journeys are probably 1 in 1000. There's little
reason to have toilets on most multiple units IMO, certainly not something
like Thameslink where the average journey is probably 45 mins.



Round here the commuter trains are often in the middle of long journeys,
between 4 and 10 hours end-to-end. Just because I’m only on board for 15
minutes doesn’t mean everyone else is.


Anna Noyd-Dryver



  #36   Report Post  
Old January 26th 19, 10:10 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Feb 2018
Posts: 85
Default When the software meets the hardware

wrote:


Perhaps install more toilets in stations and get rid of them on trains
altogether. We're a small island, there are no journeys really long enough to


make them worthwhile except maybe the overnight sleeper to scotland but thats


not a commuter train.


People travelling 5h30 from Paddington to Penzance might disagree.


Possibly, but those sort of journeys are probably 1 in 1000. There's little
reason to have toilets on most multiple units IMO, certainly not something
like Thameslink where the average journey is probably 45 mins.



Thought you had children?
Many youngsters are not able to go for hours without having to go the
toilet and many seem to want use one soon after all preparations have been
completed ,possibly brought on by excitement.
Would not like to spend the time on a long journey in the vicinity of an 7
year old who has **** himself and a child of that age will not be in
nappies.
Then there is the large percentage of the population who are female whose
different plumbing ,menstrual
cycles and smaller bladder capacity when pregnant often means they need
toilet facilities more often than men.
I would agree you don’t need toilets on commuter trains where such as
crossrail where off train facilities can not be too far away and frequent
services make journey interruptions not the end of the world but there are
many journeys around the 3 to 5 hour length such as Waterloo Exeter that
some would fine awkward, your proposal that people could get off at
stations might work for a single traveller , but they might be giving up a
reserved seat. Could be even worse for a family who would have to get off
at successive stops as each sprog
decides its their time to go.

GH




  #37   Report Post  
Old January 27th 19, 01:05 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jul 2018
Posts: 7
Default When the software meets the hardware

On 26/01/2019 22:20, Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 26 Jan 2019 09:52:16 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 20:22:39 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
The vacuum flush saves water and retention tank capacity and allows the
train to run a whole day (or maybe two, for those which outstable) without
tanking;

How delightful. A mobile sewage farm.


The alternative is for the entire railway to be the sewage farm.


I meant in the sense of them no necessarily being emptied every night.


How else would you deal with the sets which outstable at Hereford,
Worcester and Exeter?

So the toilets are complex so that when a fault occurs due to their
complexity
a technician can be notified? Calling Mr Heller....


Conventional toilets get blocked too. Conventional toilet door locks fail
too. Conventional toilets run out of water too...


I can't remember the last time the toilets in my office failed never mind
my house. As for the locks failing, who the hell cares? Keep it shut with your
foot.


How does that work with a sliding door, a wheelchair user, or even a
non-wheelchair user in the accessible toilets where the door is too far
away? Or the occasional station toilet cubicle where the door opens
outwards...

The toilets in your house presumably aren’t used as intensively as train
ones? Over the years I’ve known domestic toilets get blocked, flush broken,
flushes which only work with a certain technique, multiple flushes needed
to actually clear the bowl... Mess room toilets which perhaps approach
train toilet frequency of use, get blocked often enough that people add the
word 'again' when they talk about it...

Perhaps install more toilets in stations and get rid of them on trains
altogether. We're a small island, there are no journeys really long enough to

make them worthwhile except maybe the overnight sleeper to scotland but thats

not a commuter train.


People travelling 5h30 from Paddington to Penzance might disagree.


Possibly, but those sort of journeys are probably 1 in 1000. There's little
reason to have toilets on most multiple units IMO, certainly not something
like Thameslink where the average journey is probably 45 mins.



Round here the commuter trains are often in the middle of long journeys,
between 4 and 10 hours end-to-end. Just because I’m only on board for 15
minutes doesn’t mean everyone else is.

The guard was just locking the only working wash room on a Cardiff
Pompey service last year just as I got there. He suggested I got off at
Cosham so I had him endorse my ticket and caught the following gWr
service with a one hour delay. I claimed my refund for an hour's delay
and got it.
  #38   Report Post  
Old January 27th 19, 04:46 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 190
Default When the software meets the hardware

martin.coffee wrote:


The guard was just locking the only working wash room on a Cardiff
Pompey service last year just as I got there. He suggested I got off at
Cosham so I had him endorse my ticket and caught the following gWr
service with a one hour delay. I claimed my refund for an hour's delay
and got it.


If the toilet was working, why was it being locked out of use?


Anna Noyd-Dryver

  #39   Report Post  
Old January 27th 19, 09:45 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jul 2018
Posts: 7
Default When the software meets the hardware

On 27/01/2019 05:46, Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
martin.coffee wrote:


The guard was just locking the only working wash room on a Cardiff
Pompey service last year just as I got there. He suggested I got off at
Cosham so I had him endorse my ticket and caught the following gWr
service with a one hour delay. I claimed my refund for an hour's delay
and got it.


If the toilet was working, why was it being locked out of use?


Because it was no longer working!

  #40   Report Post  
Old January 27th 19, 12:29 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jan 2019
Posts: 1
Default When the software meets the hardware

On Sat, 26 Jan 2019 22:20:37 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Sat, 26 Jan 2019 09:52:16 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
wrote:
On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 20:22:39 -0000 (UTC)
Anna Noyd-Dryver wrote:
The vacuum flush saves water and retention tank capacity and allows the
train to run a whole day (or maybe two, for those which outstable) without


tanking;

How delightful. A mobile sewage farm.


The alternative is for the entire railway to be the sewage farm.


I meant in the sense of them no necessarily being emptied every night.


How else would you deal with the sets which outstable at Hereford,
Worcester and Exeter?


A portable vacuum unit to empty them. How else?

I can't remember the last time the toilets in my office failed never mind
my house. As for the locks failing, who the hell cares? Keep it shut with

your
foot.


How does that work with a sliding door, a wheelchair user, or even a
non-wheelchair user in the accessible toilets where the door is too far
away? Or the occasional station toilet cubicle where the door opens
outwards...


So make the open inward. Why does it have to slide? How do disabled people
cope in non train toilets?

The toilets in your house presumably aren’t used as intensively as train
ones? Over the years I’ve known domestic toilets get blocked, flush broken,
flushes which only work with a certain technique, multiple flushes needed
to actually clear the bowl... Mess room toilets which perhaps approach
train toilet frequency of use, get blocked often enough that people add the
word 'again' when they talk about it...


I can barely recall the last time I saw anyone use a toilet on a commuter
train.

Possibly, but those sort of journeys are probably 1 in 1000. There's little
reason to have toilets on most multiple units IMO, certainly not something
like Thameslink where the average journey is probably 45 mins.



Round here the commuter trains are often in the middle of long journeys,
between 4 and 10 hours end-to-end. Just because I’m only on board for 15
minutes doesn’t mean everyone else is.


10 hours? Where the hell is it going from and to?



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Welcome! - Free Software Directory - Free Software Foundation______ [email protected] London Transport 0 July 23rd 08 06:54 PM
Free Free Software Downloads and Software Reviews Download [email protected] London Transport 0 July 12th 08 10:40 AM
email extractor , site , solutions , email based marketing , email marketing solution , email extractor , newsletter software , mass email , e-mail marketing , email marketing solutions , bulk email software , web advertising , email marketing , mark Nuclear Incorporation. www.nuclear-inc.com London Transport 0 April 5th 07 08:38 PM
LU Software Demo Peter Smyth London Transport 7 February 21st 07 03:15 PM
Software Trial for Delivery/Courier Business mobibiz London Transport 0 August 1st 06 01:49 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:54 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 London Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about London Transport"

 

Copyright © 2017