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Old January 5th 21, 10:38 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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"Recliner" wrote in message
...

The official version is up:
https://content.tfl.gov.uk/standard-tube-map.pdf


That link is timing out for me. The one which works is
https://tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/do...d-tube-map.pdf - that's
dated December 2020.


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Old January 5th 21, 10:48 AM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
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NY wrote:
"Recliner" wrote in message
...

The official version is up:
https://content.tfl.gov.uk/standard-tube-map.pdf


That link is timing out for me. The one which works is
https://tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/do...d-tube-map.pdf - that's
dated December 2020.



Yes, the first link seems to have just been replaced by the one you've
supplied. It was working this morning.

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Old January 5th 21, 10:53 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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On 05/01/2021 11:36, NY wrote:
"Recliner" wrote in message
...

They presumably hope HM will perform the opening ceremony when "One's"
line
is formally opened under its official brand. I assume the Elizabeth Line
name will be used once the central tunnel and new stations are opened,
even
if all the sections don't yet have through services. So that could happen
this autumn.


I wonder how many people will use the name "Elizabeth Line" in normal
parlance, compared with those that call it "Crossrail [Line]". I bet it
gets abbreviated to "Liz Line" ;-)


Journalists and political people see to be the only ones who use the new
name for the New Severn Bridge. The rest of us still call it the New
Severn Bridge.

Old habits die hard and I'm sure the same will apply to Crossrail for a
long while.
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Old January 5th 21, 11:22 AM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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Default Thameslink returns to the Tube Map

wrote in message
...
On 05/01/2021 11:36, NY wrote:
"Recliner" wrote in message
...

They presumably hope HM will perform the opening ceremony when "One's"
line
is formally opened under its official brand. I assume the Elizabeth Line
name will be used once the central tunnel and new stations are opened,
even
if all the sections don't yet have through services. So that could
happen
this autumn.


I wonder how many people will use the name "Elizabeth Line" in normal
parlance, compared with those that call it "Crossrail [Line]". I bet it
gets abbreviated to "Liz Line" ;-)


Journalists and political people see to be the only ones who use the new
name for the New Severn Bridge. The rest of us still call it the New
Severn Bridge.

Old habits die hard and I'm sure the same will apply to Crossrail for a
long while.


I agree. The first name is the one that sticks in people's minds. If they'd
wanted to called it the Elizabeth Line, they should have used that name from
the start. Having first called it Crossrail, that's the name they should
stick with.

Like for Opal Fruits, Marathon and Jif.

I hadn't even realised that the New Severn Bridge was now called the Prince
of Wales Bridge.

At least we haven't adopted the US policy of naming everything after the
full name (including the middle initial without which no official US name is
incomplete!) of a sponsor.

Boston Airport is either "Boston Airport" or "Logan Airport" as far as I'm
concerned, not "General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport".

Why *do* Americans insist on using their middle initials/names on official
documentation? Does "John H Smith" sound more impressive than "John Smith"?
And why do so many Americans have Roman numerals after their names? Is it
because children are named after their father, grandfather and great
grandfather (all called John Smith, distinguished by I, II, III and IV
suffix) rather than being adventurous and choosing different forenames for
each generation?



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Old January 5th 21, 01:10 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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In message , at 12:22:00 on Tue, 5 Jan 2021,
NY remarked:

The first name is the one that sticks in people's minds. If they'd
wanted to called it the Elizabeth Line, they should have used that name
from the start. Having first called it Crossrail, that's the name they
should stick with.

Like for Opal Fruits, Marathon and Jif.

I hadn't even realised that the New Severn Bridge was now called the
Prince of Wales Bridge.


I've never heard a member of the public refer to the Dartford Bridge as
the QE II bridge. Then there's "Big Ben" (yes, I know that's the bell)
and Elizabeth Tower.

At least we haven't adopted the US policy of naming everything after
the full name (including the middle initial without which no official
US name is incomplete!) of a sponsor.

Boston Airport is either "Boston Airport" or "Logan Airport" as far as
I'm concerned, not "General Edward Lawrence Logan International
Airport".

Why *do* Americans insist on using their middle initials/names on
official documentation? Does "John H Smith" sound more impressive than
"John Smith"?


Because of the same reason as below. Hence George "W" Bush for example.

And why do so many Americans have Roman numerals after their names? Is
it because children are named after their father, grandfather and great
grandfather (all called John Smith, distinguished by I, II, III and IV
suffix) rather than being adventurous and choosing different forenames
for each generation?


It's just a cultural thing, like many Europeans have names like Magnus
Magnus*son*, and innumerable similar Slavic suffices.
--
Roland Perry
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Old January 5th 21, 02:00 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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NY wrote:

Why *do* Americans insist on using their middle initials/names on official
documentation? Does "John H Smith" sound more impressive than "John Smith"?


Apparently it does. Harry S Truman was given his middle initial in order
to suggest a middle name that he didn’t actually have.

And why do so many Americans have Roman numerals after their names? Is it
because children are named after their father, grandfather and great
grandfather (all called John Smith, distinguished by I, II, III and IV
suffix) rather than being adventurous and choosing different forenames for
each generation?


It’s their way of creating a dynasty. It usually goes Sr, Jr, III, etc.

Sam

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The entity formerly known as
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  #58   Report Post  
Old January 5th 21, 02:17 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
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NY wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 05/01/2021 11:36, NY wrote:
"Recliner" wrote in message
...

They presumably hope HM will perform the opening ceremony when "One's"
line
is formally opened under its official brand. I assume the Elizabeth Line
name will be used once the central tunnel and new stations are opened,
even
if all the sections don't yet have through services. So that could
happen
this autumn.

I wonder how many people will use the name "Elizabeth Line" in normal
parlance, compared with those that call it "Crossrail [Line]". I bet it
gets abbreviated to "Liz Line" ;-)


Journalists and political people see to be the only ones who use the new
name for the New Severn Bridge. The rest of us still call it the New
Severn Bridge.

Old habits die hard and I'm sure the same will apply to Crossrail for a
long while.


I agree. The first name is the one that sticks in people's minds. If they'd
wanted to called it the Elizabeth Line, they should have used that name from
the start. Having first called it Crossrail, that's the name they should
stick with.


The name changed because 'they' changed. The Elizabeth Line moniker was Al
Kemal's idea, while he was mayor — he's obviously fond of rebranding. I'm
not sure if anyone else was enthusiastic, but it was hard for people to
object publicly.

There is a history of renaming London line: the Bakerloo, Jubilee, Northern
and Piccadilly lines were not the original names for those lines, and
London Overground is also a rebranding of a number of old (mainly 19th
century) lines. Even Thameslink is a 1980s rebranding of an 1866 line that
closed to passengers in 1916.

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Old January 5th 21, 02:25 PM posted to uk.transport.london,uk.railway
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Sam Wilson wrote:
NY wrote:

Why *do* Americans insist on using their middle initials/names on official
documentation? Does "John H Smith" sound more impressive than "John Smith"?


Apparently it does. Harry S Truman was given his middle initial in order
to suggest a middle name that he didn’t actually have.

And why do so many Americans have Roman numerals after their names? Is it
because children are named after their father, grandfather and great
grandfather (all called John Smith, distinguished by I, II, III and IV
suffix) rather than being adventurous and choosing different forenames for
each generation?


It’s their way of creating a dynasty. It usually goes Sr, Jr, III, etc.


I suppose it's their substitute for a royal family.



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Old January 5th 21, 03:22 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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It's just a cultural thing, like many Europeans have names like Magnus
Magnus*son*, and innumerable similar Slavic suffices.


Slavic? I thought it came from the Icelandic. There surnames come from the
first name of the parent.
So Magnusson is the male offspring of a chap whose first name was Magnus
something elseson. If he also had a female offspring her surname would be
Magnusdottir. (Magnus’s daughter)

It made for an interesting telephone book....


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