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-   -   Non-topological map of London rail routes (https://www.londonbanter.co.uk/london-transport/1935-non-topological-map-london-rail.html)

Michael Hoffman July 6th 04 11:13 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
On Sat, 3 Jul 2004, Howard Fisher wrote:

Does anyone know of a map of London rail routes that shows stations at a
distance from the centre based on their typical direct rail journey
time?


I think there's something like this at the London Transport Museum.
--
Michael Hoffman

Listy July 11th 04 12:02 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 

"Michael Hoffman" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Sat, 3 Jul 2004, Howard Fisher wrote:

Does anyone know of a map of London rail routes that shows stations at a
distance from the centre based on their typical direct rail journey
time?


I think there's something like this at the London Transport Museum.


Found this the other day, is it the sort of thing you're after?

http://www.kordy.dircon.co.uk/misc/lul.gif


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l i s enter
listener


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Michael Hoffman July 11th 04 01:15 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004, Listy wrote:

"Michael Hoffman" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Sat, 3 Jul 2004, Howard Fisher wrote:

Does anyone know of a map of London rail routes that shows stations at a
distance from the centre based on their typical direct rail journey
time?


I think there's something like this at the London Transport Museum.


Found this the other day, is it the sort of thing you're after?

http://www.kordy.dircon.co.uk/misc/lul.gif


I am fond of that map and it probably answers the OP's question to some
extent. But the one at the Transport Museum actually does the distances
based on time rather than distance.

It brings up a question, though--why are there so many DLR stations at
Canary Wharf so close together? It appears that West India Quay-Canary
Wharf DLR are closer to each other than Leicester Square-Covent Garden! It
is a pretty short ride.
--
Michael Hoffman

James Farrar July 11th 04 01:53 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
Michael Hoffman wrote:

On Sun, 11 Jul 2004, Listy wrote:

"Michael Hoffman" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Sat, 3 Jul 2004, Howard Fisher wrote:

Does anyone know of a map of London rail routes that shows stations at a
distance from the centre based on their typical direct rail journey
time?

I think there's something like this at the London Transport Museum.


Found this the other day, is it the sort of thing you're after?

http://www.kordy.dircon.co.uk/misc/lul.gif


I am fond of that map and it probably answers the OP's question to some
extent. But the one at the Transport Museum actually does the distances
based on time rather than distance.

It brings up a question, though--why are there so many DLR stations at
Canary Wharf so close together? It appears that West India Quay-Canary
Wharf DLR are closer to each other than Leicester Square-Covent Garden! It
is a pretty short ride.


I believe that when the DLR was built, several of the stations were on
islands and inaccessible from each other on foot.

--
James Farrar |
London, SE13 |


John Rowland July 11th 04 10:12 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
"James Farrar" wrote in message
...
Michael Hoffman wrote:

http://www.kordy.dircon.co.uk/misc/lul.gif


why are there so many DLR stations at
Canary Wharf so close together?


I believe that when the DLR was built,
several of the stations were on
islands and inaccessible from each other on foot.


That's not a reason to build three stations, it's a reason to build the DLR
bridge a little wider and put a walkway(s) along it.

I think the multiple stations are to prevent extended dwell time at Canary
Wharf from destroying the capacity of the entire network, but I've never
seen this confirmed.

--
John Rowland - Spamtrapped
Transport Plans for the London Area, updated 2001
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acro...69/tpftla.html
A man's vehicle is a symbol of his manhood.
That's why my vehicle's the Piccadilly Line -
It's the size of a county and it comes every two and a half minutes



Dave Arquati July 12th 04 04:01 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
John Rowland wrote:
"James Farrar" wrote in message
...

Michael Hoffman wrote:

http://www.kordy.dircon.co.uk/misc/lul.gif

why are there so many DLR stations at
Canary Wharf so close together?


I believe that when the DLR was built,
several of the stations were on
islands and inaccessible from each other on foot.



That's not a reason to build three stations, it's a reason to build the DLR
bridge a little wider and put a walkway(s) along it.

I think the multiple stations are to prevent extended dwell time at Canary
Wharf from destroying the capacity of the entire network, but I've never
seen this confirmed.


I wouldn't have thought so - the Olympia & York development at Canary
Wharf wasn't on the cards until after DLR construction had started.
Canary Wharf station was originally built to the same size as all the
other tiny original DLR stations were, but it never opened like that.

--
Dave Arquati
Imperial College, SW7
www.alwaystouchout.com - Transport projects in London

PRAR July 13th 04 06:44 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 14:15:59 +0100, Michael Hoffman
wrote:

It brings up a question, though--why are there so many DLR stations at
Canary Wharf so close together? It appears that West India Quay-Canary
Wharf DLR are closer to each other than Leicester Square-Covent Garden! It
is a pretty short ride.


They are built on the former docks so there are stretches of water
between each station. As there are few other bridges it's quite handy
that DLR serves each individual dock. You should still be able to see
some of the water, but as the area gets more developed it is slowly
vanishing.




PRAR
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Howard Fisher July 15th 04 05:24 PM

Non-topological map of London rail routes
 
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004, Michael Hoffman
wrote:
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004, Listy wrote:

"Michael Hoffman" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Sat, 3 Jul 2004, Howard Fisher wrote:

Does anyone know of a map of London rail routes that shows stations at a
distance from the centre based on their typical direct rail journey
time?

I think there's something like this at the London Transport Museum.


Found this the other day, is it the sort of thing you're after?

http://www.kordy.dircon.co.uk/misc/lul.gif


I am fond of that map and it probably answers the OP's question to some
extent. But the one at the Transport Museum actually does the distances
based on time rather than distance.


Yes, that was what I'm after. I was hoping there was one on the web, but
looks like I'll need to go to the LT museum.

Thanks
--
Howard


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