London Transport (uk.transport.london) Discussion of all forms of transport in London.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old January 26th 18, 09:47 AM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2017
Posts: 136
Default Last days of the 172s on the electrified GOBLIN

On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 14:36:54 -0600
wrote:
In article
-september
..org,
(Recliner) wrote:
By your logic, TfL should have ordered more of the proven, in-service
313s, not the dangerously new-fangled 378s, when increasing the LO fleet.


In fact, with modern manufacturing, especially where electronics are
involved, technology can move on to the point where obsolete design
manufacture is no longer affordable because the machinery is no longer
available.

This happened in the late 1990s with the radios used for RETB signalling.
Railtrack wanted more of an obsolete design of the radios which used a form
of electronics which was no longer makeable, more or less at any price. This


That sounds highly unlikely. You can still buy chips designed in the 70s
if you so desi

https://www.digikey.co.uk/catalog/en...roup/z80/15507

so the chances of whatever microcontroller the radios used being unavailable
is pretty slim. Plus the analogue radio components and op-amps will always be
available until someone invents usable optotronics. More than likely the cost
of redesigning the board for SMDs was more than railtrack was prepared to pay.


  #2   Report Post  
Old January 26th 18, 12:02 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,058
Default Last days of the 172s on the electrified GOBLIN

In message , at 09:47:43 on Fri, 26 Jan
2018, remarked:

You can still buy


a subset of

chips designed in the 70s if you so desi


Hence stories about NASA having to scour eBay for some parts need for
maintaining legacy equipment.
--
Roland Perry
  #3   Report Post  
Old January 26th 18, 12:32 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,868
Default Last days of the 172s on the electrified GOBLIN

In article , () wrote:

On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 14:36:54 -0600
wrote:
In article
-s
eptember.org,
(Recliner) wrote:
By your logic, TfL should have ordered more of the proven, in-service
313s, not the dangerously new-fangled 378s, when increasing the LO
fleet.


In fact, with modern manufacturing, especially where electronics are
involved, technology can move on to the point where obsolete design
manufacture is no longer affordable because the machinery is no longer
available.

This happened in the late 1990s with the radios used for RETB signalling.
Railtrack wanted more of an obsolete design of the radios which used a
form of electronics which was no longer makeable, more or less at any
price.


That sounds highly unlikely. You can still buy chips designed in the
70s if you so desi

https://www.digikey.co.uk/catalog/en...roup/z80/15507


But you can't create the circuit boards and assemble them at affordable
costs. Repairing existing boards is another matter. There is an established
cottage industry that kept similar radios in use on the NRN until it was
switched off.

so the chances of whatever microcontroller the radios used being
unavailable is pretty slim. Plus the analogue radio components and op-amps
will always be available until someone invents usable optotronics. More
than likely the cost of redesigning the board for SMDs was more than
railtrack was prepared to pay.


So you know more than a multi-national radio manufacturing company? It's a
true story, as told to me by our salesman to Railtrack at the time.

The problem was the cost and time taken to get new technology-based radios
type approved for use in the small quantities needed for the areas of RETB
signalling.

--
Colin Rosenstiel
  #4   Report Post  
Old January 26th 18, 02:22 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2017
Posts: 136
Default Last days of the 172s on the electrified GOBLIN

On Fri, 26 Jan 2018 12:02:51 +0000
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:47:43 on Fri, 26 Jan
2018, remarked:

You can still buy


a subset of

chips designed in the 70s if you so desi


Hence stories about NASA having to scour eBay for some parts need for
maintaining legacy equipment.


NASA tends not to use off the shelf parts.


  #5   Report Post  
Old January 26th 18, 02:24 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2017
Posts: 136
Default Last days of the 172s on the electrified GOBLIN

On Fri, 26 Jan 2018 06:32:11 -0600
wrote:
In article ,
() wrote:
That sounds highly unlikely. You can still buy chips designed in the
70s if you so desi

https://www.digikey.co.uk/catalog/en...roup/z80/15507

But you can't create the circuit boards and assemble them at affordable
costs.


Which is what I said.

so the chances of whatever microcontroller the radios used being
unavailable is pretty slim. Plus the analogue radio components and op-amps
will always be available until someone invents usable optotronics. More
than likely the cost of redesigning the board for SMDs was more than
railtrack was prepared to pay.


So you know more than a multi-national radio manufacturing company? It's a
true story, as told to me by our salesman to Railtrack at the time.


Told to you by a salesman? Oh well, it MUST be true then.




  #10   Report Post  
Old January 26th 18, 11:32 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,868
Default Last days of the 172s on the electrified GOBLIN

In article , () wrote:

On Fri, 26 Jan 2018 06:32:11 -0600
wrote:
In article ,
() wrote:
That sounds highly unlikely. You can still buy chips designed in the
70s if you so desi

https://www.digikey.co.uk/catalog/en...roup/z80/15507

But you can't create the circuit boards and assemble them at affordable
costs.


Which is what I said.

so the chances of whatever microcontroller the radios used being
unavailable is pretty slim. Plus the analogue radio components and
op-amps will always be available until someone invents usable
optotronics. More than likely the cost of redesigning the board for
SMDs was more than railtrack was prepared to pay.


So you know more than a multi-national radio manufacturing company? It's
a true story, as told to me by our salesman to Railtrack at the time.


Told to you by a salesman? Oh well, it MUST be true then.


He was an engineer who maintained the company's relationship with the
railway. We made all the NRN radios in the 1980s and 1990s (at least all
those I've seen in cabs on depot visits in recent years). I worked there for
over 25 years so knew a lot about how the kit was manufactured.

--
Colin Rosenstiel


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GOBLIN 172s: where do they go during their hols? Recliner[_3_] London Transport 30 January 5th 17 10:43 AM
Last two days of Routemasters Paul London Transport 10 December 5th 05 03:16 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:07 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 London Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about London Transport"

 

Copyright © 2017