London Transport (uk.transport.london) Discussion of all forms of transport in London.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old September 12th 19, 04:23 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,262
Default Distances from London


The AA used to produce a set of paper maps which were mostly black and
white but had red lines indicating the best driving route from the city
named on the front to every major town in Britain. Does anyone know what
they were called, because I can't find anything abut them on the web.
I'd like to know for how many different cities were these maps produced.

--
Basil Jet recently enjoyed listening to
Gang Of Four - 2019 - Happy Now

  #2   Report Post  
Old September 12th 19, 05:29 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,777
Default Distances from London

In message , at 16:23:37 on Thu, 12 Sep
2019, Basil Jet remarked:

The AA used to produce a set of paper maps which were mostly black and
white but had red lines indicating the best driving route from the city
named on the front to every major town in Britain. Does anyone know
what they were called, because I can't find anything abut them on the
web. I'd like to know for how many different cities were these maps
produced.


My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what process
they used to produce them?
--
Roland Perry
  #3   Report Post  
Old September 12th 19, 07:07 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 135
Default Distances from London

On 12/09/2019 17:29, Roland Perry wrote:

My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what process
they used to produce them?


The ones I remember are the ones we used to order before going on
holiday in a new area.

Send them the required start and finish points, and you got a booklet of
strip maps, sort of like the ones that Autoroute could be told to print
out in its early days. They had written directions on them as well.

I think they were produced by using a standard set of route segments,
assembled by hand.

Checks Blimey,they still offer the service,but it's on line now.

Nowadays, you can print the text route (Including the signs to follow at
major junctions) yourself with an option to print a map of any confusing
sections.

https://www.theaa.com/route-planner/route

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
  #4   Report Post  
Old September 13th 19, 06:47 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 57
Default Distances from London

On 12/09/2019 19:07, John Williamson wrote:
On 12/09/2019 17:29, Roland Perry wrote:

My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what process
they used to produce them?


The ones I remember are the ones we used to order before going on
holiday in a new area.

Send them the required start and finish points, and you got a booklet of
strip maps, sort of like the ones that Autoroute could be told to print
out in its early days. They had written directions on them as well.

I think they were produced by using a standard set of route segments,
assembled by hand.

Checks Blimey,they still offer the service,but it's on line now.

Nowadays, you can print the text route (Including the signs to follow at
major junctions) yourself with an option to print a map of any confusing
sections.

https://www.theaa.com/route-planner/route



https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...eline#aaroutes

PA

  #5   Report Post  
Old September 13th 19, 08:50 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,262
Default Distances from London

On 13/09/2019 18:47, Peter Able wrote:
On 12/09/2019 19:07, John Williamson wrote:
On 12/09/2019 17:29, Roland Perry wrote:

My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what process
they used to produce them?


The ones I remember are the ones we used to order before going on
holiday in a new area.

Send them the required start and finish points, and you got a booklet
of strip maps, sort of like the ones that Autoroute could be told to
print out in its early days. They had written directions on them as well.

I think they were produced by using a standard set of route segments,
assembled by hand.

Checks Blimey,they still offer the service,but it's on line now.

Nowadays, you can print the text route (Including the signs to follow
at major junctions) yourself with an option to print a map of any
confusing sections.

https://www.theaa.com/route-planner/route


https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...eline#aaroutes


Thanks, the pertinent bit is lower down at
https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...e#routesgrowth

The maps were called "Throughroutes", and there were about 50 of them.

--
Basil Jet recently enjoyed listening to
Sleater-Kinney - 2000 - All Hands On The Bad One


  #6   Report Post  
Old September 13th 19, 09:34 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,777
Default Distances from London

In message , at 20:50:20 on Fri, 13 Sep
2019, Basil Jet remarked:
My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what process
they used to produce them?

The ones I remember are the ones we used to order before going on
holiday in a new area.

Send them the required start and finish points, and you got a
booklet of strip maps, sort of like the ones that Autoroute could be
told to print out in its early days. They had written directions on
them as well.

I think they were produced by using a standard set of route
segments, assembled by hand.

Checks Blimey,they still offer the service,but it's on line now.

Nowadays, you can print the text route (Including the signs to
follow at major junctions) yourself with an option to print a map of
any confusing sections.

https://www.theaa.com/route-planner/route

https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...eline#aaroutes


Thanks, the pertinent bit is lower down at
https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...e#routesgrowth

The maps were called "Throughroutes", and there were about 50 of them.


Where were the ones starting in London originated from?

--
Roland Perry
  #7   Report Post  
Old September 14th 19, 10:16 AM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: May 2011
Posts: 143
Default Distances from London

"Roland Perry" wrote in message
...
In message , at 20:50:20 on Fri, 13 Sep 2019,
Basil Jet remarked:
My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of
them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what
process
they used to produce them?

The ones I remember are the ones we used to order before going on
holiday in a new area.

Send them the required start and finish points, and you got a booklet
of strip maps, sort of like the ones that Autoroute could be told to
print out in its early days. They had written directions on them as
well.

I think they were produced by using a standard set of route segments,
assembled by hand.

Checks Blimey,they still offer the service,but it's on line now.

Nowadays, you can print the text route (Including the signs to follow
at major junctions) yourself with an option to print a map of any
confusing sections.

https://www.theaa.com/route-planner/route
https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...eline#aaroutes


Thanks, the pertinent bit is lower down at
https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...e#routesgrowth

The maps were called "Throughroutes", and there were about 50 of them.


Where were the ones starting in London originated from?



I have an ancient AA Road Book ("second post-war edition") with maps and
desriptions of these routes. For anywhere outside the London area "London"
is always Hyde Park Corner. However, the descriptions include routes from
Kew Bridge, London Bridge, Blackwall Tunnel and Woolwich Ferry. There is
also a table of distances in the back, which are all from Charing Cross.

--
DAS

  #8   Report Post  
Old September 14th 19, 12:45 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,777
Default Distances from London

In message , at 10:16:13 on Sat, 14 Sep
2019, D A Stocks remarked:
"Roland Perry" wrote in message
...
In message , at 20:50:20 on Fri, 13 Sep
2019, Basil Jet remarked:
My recollection is that there were a surprisingly large number of
them,
indeed you might even be able to get a custom one. I wonder what
process
they used to produce them?

The ones I remember are the ones we used to order before going on
holiday in a new area.

Send them the required start and finish points, and you got a
booklet of strip maps, sort of like the ones that Autoroute could
be told to print out in its early days. They had written
directions on them as well.

I think they were produced by using a standard set of route
segments, assembled by hand.

Checks Blimey,they still offer the service,but it's on line now.

Nowadays, you can print the text route (Including the signs to
follow at major junctions) yourself with an option to print a map
of any confusing sections.

https://www.theaa.com/route-planner/route
https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...eline#aaroutes

Thanks, the pertinent bit is lower down at
https://www.theaa.com/about-us/aa-hi...e#routesgrowth

The maps were called "Throughroutes", and there were about 50 of them.


Where were the ones starting in London originated from?


I have an ancient AA Road Book ("second post-war edition") with maps
and desriptions of these routes. For anywhere outside the London area
"London" is always Hyde Park Corner. However, the descriptions include
routes from Kew Bridge, London Bridge, Blackwall Tunnel and Woolwich
Ferry. There is also a table of distances in the back, which are all
from Charing Cross.


Thanks for that. Sounds like it was produced in the transitional phase
where the various peripheral gateways were being consolidated onto
Trafalgar Square.

(I presume they didn't mean Charing Cross Station, or the replica Cross
in its forecourt).
--
Roland Perry
  #9   Report Post  
Old September 14th 19, 03:49 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 135
Default Distances from London

On 14/09/2019 12:45, Roland Perry wrote:

(I presume they didn't mean Charing Cross Station, or the replica Cross
in its forecourt).


The official centre of London, from which all mileages are supposedly
measured has been the statue of Charles I in Trafalgar Square for quite
a while now. Presumably, for the pedantic, from the top of his head or
where his body meets the saddle. (Phew! I managed to avoid saying a rude
word. :-) )

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
  #10   Report Post  
Old September 14th 19, 04:38 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 9,777
Default Distances from London

In message , at 15:49:30 on Sat, 14
Sep 2019, John Williamson remarked:
On 14/09/2019 12:45, Roland Perry wrote:

(I presume they didn't mean Charing Cross Station, or the replica Cross
in its forecourt).


The official centre of London, from which all mileages are supposedly
measured has been the statue of Charles I in Trafalgar Square for quite
a while now. Presumably, for the pedantic, from the top of his head or
where his body meets the saddle. (Phew! I managed to avoid saying a
rude word. :-) )


That's precisely what we are discussing, but in the absence of any
evidence of who/what made it official (and when).
--
Roland Perry


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 11:25 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 London Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about London Transport"

 

Copyright © 2017