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Old May 23rd 20, 02:09 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

In message , at 13:58:22 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender. The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.


Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads, what's
the risk you allude to?


Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.


On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.
--
Roland Perry

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Old May 23rd 20, 02:40 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

On Sat, 23 May 2020 15:09:16 +0100, Roland Perry
wrote:

In message , at 13:58:22 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender. The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads, what's
the risk you allude to?


Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.


On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.


What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?
  #73   Report Post  
Old May 23rd 20, 05:08 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Posts: 9,989
Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

In message , at 15:40:12 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
On Sat, 23 May 2020 15:09:16 +0100, Roland Perry
wrote:

In message , at 13:58:22 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender. The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads, what's
the risk you allude to?

Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.


On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.


What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?


Contact with infected [but possibly asymptotic] pupils (or colleagues,
or non-teaching staff).
--
Roland Perry
  #74   Report Post  
Old May 23rd 20, 08:50 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:40:12 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
On Sat, 23 May 2020 15:09:16 +0100, Roland Perry
wrote:

In message , at 13:58:22 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender. The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads, what's
the risk you allude to?

Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.

On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.


What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?


Contact with infected [but possibly asymptotic] pupils (or colleagues,
or non-teaching staff).


As I've already pointed out in this thread, teachers have a much lower risk
of contracting Covid than the general public. That's why I said that the
greatest risk to teachers is the commute.

  #75   Report Post  
Old May 24th 20, 07:07 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

In message , at 20:50:21 on Sat, 23 May
2020, Recliner remarked:

Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender. The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads, what's
the risk you allude to?

Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.

On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.

What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?


Contact with infected [but possibly asymptotic] pupils (or colleagues,
or non-teaching staff).


As I've already pointed out in this thread, teachers have a much lower risk
of contracting Covid than the general public.


We need a new meme: Ask two different statisticians, get three answers;

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ivided-over-co
ronavirus-risk-to-children-if-schools-reopen

That's why I said that the greatest risk to teachers is the commute.


From RTAs?
--
Roland Perry


  #76   Report Post  
Old May 24th 20, 08:43 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Posts: 1,071
Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train



"Recliner" wrote in message
...
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:40:12 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
On Sat, 23 May 2020 15:09:16 +0100, Roland Perry
wrote:

In message , at 13:58:22 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from
Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender.
The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the
school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on
public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't
want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this
specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads,
what's
the risk you allude to?

Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.

On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.

What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?


Contact with infected [but possibly asymptotic] pupils (or colleagues,
or non-teaching staff).


As I've already pointed out in this thread, teachers have a much lower
risk
of contracting Covid than the general public.


This would be teachers not doing their normal job? (Yes I know that schools
are still partially open)

How come they have less chance than the rest of the general public, of
catching the disease in their not-working part of the day

tim



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Old May 24th 20, 09:33 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 20:50:21 on Sat, 23 May
2020, Recliner remarked:

Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender. The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads, what's
the risk you allude to?

Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.

On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.

What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?

Contact with infected [but possibly asymptotic] pupils (or colleagues,
or non-teaching staff).


As I've already pointed out in this thread, teachers have a much lower risk
of contracting Covid than the general public.


We need a new meme: Ask two different statisticians, get three answers;

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ivided-over-co
ronavirus-risk-to-children-if-schools-reopen

That's why I said that the greatest risk to teachers is the commute.


From RTAs?


Yes

  #78   Report Post  
Old May 24th 20, 09:36 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Posts: 622
Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

tim... wrote:


"Recliner" wrote in message
...
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:40:12 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
On Sat, 23 May 2020 15:09:16 +0100, Roland Perry
wrote:

In message , at 13:58:22 on
Sat, 23 May 2020, Recliner remarked:
Apparently teachers have had a significantly lower death rate from
Covid
than the wider population, after correcting for age and gender.
The
greatest risk of schools reopening is the journey to and from the
school.

Which in my experience is, for teachers, overwhelmingly not on
public
transport. Apart from anything else it's not reliable enough to
guarantee to get you for 8.30am, not a minute later.

Also, many bus routes avoid schools before 9am, because they don't
want
the hassle of kids on stage buses (yes, I've discussed this
specific
issue with a bus company when writing a school's transport policy).

Yes, I was thinking of the dangers of the drive to work.

Apart from the fact lots of people are driving with their eyes shut
because they apparently expect exclusive use of deserted roads,
what's
the risk you allude to?

Just the normal risks of the road, nothing special. In other words,
their risks of catching covid-19 are no worse than the risks of
everyday life.

On the commute, I agree. The risks arise when they get to work.

What risks? Playground or gym accidents? Explosions in the science
lab?

Contact with infected [but possibly asymptotic] pupils (or colleagues,
or non-teaching staff).


As I've already pointed out in this thread, teachers have a much lower
risk
of contracting Covid than the general public.


This would be teachers not doing their normal job? (Yes I know that schools
are still partially open)

How come they have less chance than the rest of the general public, of
catching the disease in their not-working part of the day


They were doing their normal jobs when the virus was spreading most
rapidly.
  #79   Report Post  
Old May 25th 20, 08:21 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Posts: 310
Default Coronavirus: TfL reveals 20 busiest Tube and train

On Sat, 23 May 2020 11:33:54 +0100
Arthur Figgis wrote:
On 23/05/2020 09:54, wrote:


Any government with a working pair of ******** (which rules out the current

one)
could enact emergency legislation at a time like this to put the unions
back in their box by making striking illegal for X months and shutting down
any union that proposes it.


Wouldn't that risk turning into more of a politician with one bollock
approach?


I don't follow.

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