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Old February 10th 21, 10:09 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Posts: 187
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Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:
https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601868089/San-Serriffe-special-report.pdf

Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.


You've forgotten about Letraset?


Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?
It was useful in certain spheres such as model making or labels for control
panes etc especially prototype production, but although they did enter the
leisure market by introducing some products aimed at entertaining children
I don’t think it caught on that much. In comparison the generation
before and up to say the late 1960’s almost all had or knew someone with a
John Bull printing set and the inky fingers and surroundings that went
with it, many a parent must have looked on despondently on Christmas
morning as the present from Uncle Bert was opened knowing what was to come
and suspected he had lobbed this grenade into family unity on purpose.

Got my own back on a houseshare mate who had been particularly rumbustious
when a decade later I gave his 6 year old a small drum kit.

GH




  #12   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 10:38 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 10,083
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In message , at 10:09:58 on Wed, 10
Feb 2021, Marland remarked:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:
https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601868089/San-Serriffe-special-report.pdf

Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.


You've forgotten about Letraset?


Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?


Yes, you could buy it in shops on the High Street. Anyone whose work
involved producing any kind of promotional material would be very
familiar with it.

--
Roland Perry
  #13   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 11:51 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Feb 2018
Posts: 187
Default Johnston font beneath Thames Barrier

Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 10:09:58 on Wed, 10
Feb 2021, Marland remarked:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:
https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601868089/San-Serriffe-special-report.pdf

Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.

You've forgotten about Letraset?


Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?


Yes, you could buy it in shops on the High Street. Anyone whose work
involved producing any kind of promotional material would be very
familiar with it.


Like I said ,certain spheres.
Most ordinary people were not in those back in that era and for want of a
better description” Middle Class” activities like that were less known to
those life was more blue collar , as for buying in shops on the high street
you could purchase all sorts of things from the diversity of traders that
existed in them then so it isn’t really that good a guide, most decent
towns had a Country Sports Shop but most ordinary people didn’t go and buy
a rifle.

GH

  #14   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 01:53 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 10,083
Default Johnston font beneath Thames Barrier

In message , at 11:51:34 on Wed, 10
Feb 2021, Marland remarked:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 10:09:58 on Wed, 10
Feb 2021, Marland remarked:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:

https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601...fe-special-rep


Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.

You've forgotten about Letraset?

Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?


Yes, you could buy it in shops on the High Street. Anyone whose work
involved producing any kind of promotional material would be very
familiar with it.


Like I said ,certain spheres.
Most ordinary people were not in those back in that era and for want of a
better description” Middle Class” activities like that were less known to
those life was more blue collar , as for buying in shops on the high street
you could purchase all sorts of things from the diversity of traders that
existed in them then so it isn’t really that good a guide, most decent
towns had a Country Sports Shop but most ordinary people didn’t go and buy
a rifle.


Even the Sports Shop probably produced a printed price list, and most
likely that would have been made using Letraset. Which was available in
much less specialised outlets, like WH Smith.
--
Roland Perry
  #15   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 03:45 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Feb 2018
Posts: 187
Default Johnston font beneath Thames Barrier

Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:51:34 on Wed, 10
Feb 2021, Marland remarked:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 10:09:58 on Wed, 10
Feb 2021, Marland remarked:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:

https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601...fe-special-rep


Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.

You've forgotten about Letraset?

Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?

Yes, you could buy it in shops on the High Street. Anyone whose work
involved producing any kind of promotional material would be very
familiar with it.


Like I said ,certain spheres.
Most ordinary people were not in those back in that era and for want of a
better description” Middle Class” activities like that were less known to
those life was more blue collar , as for buying in shops on the high street
you could purchase all sorts of things from the diversity of traders that
existed in them then so it isn’t really that good a guide, most decent
towns had a Country Sports Shop but most ordinary people didn’t go and buy
a rifle.


Even the Sports Shop probably produced a printed price list, and most
likely that would have been made using Letraset. Which was available in
much less specialised outlets, like WH Smith.


Many premises had their price lists on a pegboard with those letters
usually white when new but weathered often by tobacco fumes to a dirty
brown that were pinned into the board.
Unlike Letraset the information could easily be altered rather than faffing
around rubbing dry printed letters afresh each time , more up market
premises just used the local one man band print shop for which that sort of
business was their bread and butter, the late BIL was one such after he
fell out
with the practices of Fleet Street . Had quite a nice little business until
the arrival of desk top publishing first in businesses and then homes
killed it.


GH




  #16   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 05:55 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,665
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On 10/02/2021 10:09, Marland wrote:
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:
https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601868089/San-Serriffe-special-report.pdf

Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.


You've forgotten about Letraset?


Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?
It was useful in certain spheres such as model making or labels for control
panes etc especially prototype production,


Television companies were major customers, until the advent of computer
generated lettering in the mid 1970s, virtually all on-screen captions
were done with Letraset. A major exception was for the horse racing
results captions as Letraset was too slow, they were hand painted (not
written!) on 12" x 9" black card.


--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.

  #17   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 11:59 PM posted to uk.transport.london
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jun 2015
Posts: 79
Default Johnston font beneath Thames Barrier

In message , Marland
writes
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:
https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601868089/San-Serriffe-special-report.pdf

Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.


You've forgotten about Letraset?


Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?


Depends what you mean "ordinary" I recently threw away some old Letraset
I'd found

In the days before webprocessing and true type fonts (and in fact before
PCs) I used Letraset for headlines etc. in Newsletters I wrote (typing
the articles on strips of paper which were then stuck down in columns to
be photocopied for publication. I still have folders and files with
Letraset titles.
It was useful in certain spheres such as model making or labels for control
panes etc especially prototype production, but although they did enter the
leisure market by introducing some products aimed at entertaining children
I don’t think it caught on that much. In comparison the generation
before and up to say the late 1960’s almost all had or knew someone with a
John Bull printing set and the inky fingers and surroundings that went
with it, many a parent must have looked on despondently on Christmas
morning as the present from Uncle Bert was opened knowing what was to come
and suspected he had lobbed this grenade into family unity on purpose.

Got my own back on a houseshare mate who had been particularly rumbustious
when a decade later I gave his 6 year old a small drum kit.

GH




--
Bryan Morris
  #18   Report Post  
Old February 13th 21, 01:24 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Jun 2015
Posts: 79
Default Johnston font beneath Thames Barrier

In message , Bryan Morris
writes
In message , Marland
writes
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9 Feb 2021,
Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9 Feb
2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely not
Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool, was the
lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite the really
heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:

https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601...e-special-repo


Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary people knew
much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font families.

You've forgotten about Letraset?


Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary really know
about that product ?


Depends what you mean "ordinary" I recently threw away some old
Letraset I'd found

In the days before webprocessing and true type fonts (and in fact
before PCs) I used Letraset for headlines etc. in Newsletters I wrote
(typing the articles on strips of paper which were then stuck down in
columns to be photocopied for publication. I still have folders and
files with Letraset titles.


Then of course in the 70s I made loads of 8mm family movies. And the
titles, of course, were Letraset


It was useful in certain spheres such as model making or labels for control
panes etc especially prototype production, but although they did enter the
leisure market by introducing some products aimed at entertaining children
I don’t think it caught on that much. In comparison the generation
before and up to say the late 1960’s almost all had or knew someone with a
John Bull printing set and the inky fingers and surroundings that went
with it, many a parent must have looked on despondently on Christmas
morning as the present from Uncle Bert was opened knowing what was to come
and suspected he had lobbed this grenade into family unity on purpose.

Got my own back on a houseshare mate who had been particularly rumbustious
when a decade later I gave his 6 year old a small drum kit.

GH





--
Bryan Morris
  #19   Report Post  
Old February 17th 21, 11:20 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Feb 2021
Posts: 4
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On 13:24 13 Feb 2021, Bryan Morris said:
In message , Bryan Morris
writes
In message , Marland
writes
Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 16:51:03 on Tue, 9
Feb 2021, Recliner remarked:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue,
9 Feb 2021, Graeme Wall
remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on
Tue, 9 Feb 2021,* Basil Jet
remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but
definitely not Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April
Fool, was the lowest scoring one in yesterday's
"Pointless", despite the really heavy* hints in the
question about lower/upper case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly
earlier).

Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:

https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601.../San-Serriffe-

special
-repo


Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary
people knew much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font
families.

You've forgotten about Letraset?

Did many people that would come under the heading of ordinary
really know about that product ?


Depends what you mean "ordinary" I recently threw away some old
Letraset I'd found

In the days before webprocessing and true type fonts (and in fact
before PCs) I used Letraset for headlines etc. in Newsletters I
wrote (typing the articles on strips of paper which were then
stuck down in columns to be photocopied for publication. I still
have folders and files with Letraset titles.


Then of course in the 70s I made loads of 8mm family movies. And
the titles, of course, were Letraset


Bryan maybe you were making smut movies before photos. Is there also
a movie of this disgusting treatment of women in your photo?

https://ibb.co/WNrpgwB

Is that you in a latex raincoat holding the leashes of two naked
women on all fours in the rain?
  #20   Report Post  
Old February 17th 21, 02:37 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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First recorded activity at LondonBanter: Feb 2021
Posts: 4
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On 16:51 9 Feb 2021, Recliner said:
Graeme Wall wrote:
On 09/02/2021 13:49, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 11:58:43 on Tue, 9
Feb 2021, Graeme Wall remarked:
On 09/02/2021 11:11, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:51:33 on Tue, 9
Feb 2021,* Basil Jet remarked:

*One of the numerous sans serif typefaces, but definitely
not Johnston.

*I was a little surprised that "Sans Serif" as an April Fool,
was the lowest scoring one in yesterday's "Pointless", despite
the really heavy* hints in the question about lower/upper
case.

Where did the spaghetti harvest come?

Much higher (which surprised me because it was significantly
earlier).


Circa 1957 IIRC whereas San Serif was in the 1970s.


Yes, 1977:
https://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1454601.../San-Serriffe-
special-report.pdf

Of course, in that era before desktop publishing, few ordinary
people knew much about fonts, let alone about sans-serif font
families.


In the bad old days you may have needed a trip to the St Bride
library off Fleet Street to research obscure fonts. I think it's
closed down now that everyone has the Internet.


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