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Old January 16th 08, 05:49 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

I dont normally read the London Lite but an article caught my eye. There was
on an article on the average house prices around each station. The houses
had to be within half a mile of the station. Apperently Hatton Cross has the
cheapest house prices. I forget which station has the most expensive. It
would be nice to see the full list of stations and their house prices rather
than the limited ones the London Lite printed. The East London Line is the
cheapest for house prices followed by the Central Line.



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Old January 16th 08, 06:26 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

On 16 Jan, 18:49, wrote:
I dont normally read the London Lite but an article caught my eye. There was
on an article on the average house prices around each station. The houses
had to be within half a mile of the station. Apperently Hatton Cross has the
cheapest house prices. I forget which station has the most expensive. It
would be nice to see the full list of stations and their house prices rather
than the limited ones the London Lite printed. The East London Line is the
cheapest for house prices followed by the Central Line.



Hatton Cross is of course bang slap next to Heathrow airport!

I can't immediately point you to anything offhand that fits the bill,
but there is a vast amount of information about house prices in the
various districts of London out there on the net. Of course as a
general rule of thumb one can expect house prices in the vicinity of
Underground stations to be higher.

I note that the houses assessed "had to be within half a mile of the
station" - factor in a mere 10 minutes walk and the overall picture
could be quite different.
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Old January 16th 08, 07:14 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

This appeared on the Going Underground blog:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2341/...65864844f3.jpg

As the Circle line runs exclusively in Zone 1, I suppose I shouldn't
have been too surprised about the result. The least expensive stop on
the Circle Line is Aldgate, with average property values hovering
around £396,000.

The Victoria Line came as the next most expensive line to buy property
on, with average prices reaching £1,109,107. Green Park was most
expensive stop for property on the Victoria Line with average house
prices above £2 million. The least expensive stop was Tottenham Hale.

"We were somewhat surprised to find the District Line appear in the
seventh position, given it includes areas such as Fulham, Richmond and
Wimbledon and follows the Circle Line through many parts of Central
London. It would be interesting to see where the East London Line
would rank today if the 2010 extension was already in place." said
Michael O'Flynn, from FindaProperty. Apparently the Essex parts of the
District Line weakened its overall average.

The Waterloo & City Line came in at last place as there are "minimal
residential pockets" around Waterloo and Bank stations.
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Old January 16th 08, 08:12 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

On Wed, 16 Jan 2008 11:26:15 -0800 (PST), Mizter T
wrote:

On 16 Jan, 18:49, wrote:
I dont normally read the London Lite but an article caught my eye. There was
on an article on the average house prices around each station. The houses
had to be within half a mile of the station. Apperently Hatton Cross has the
cheapest house prices. I forget which station has the most expensive. It
would be nice to see the full list of stations and their house prices rather
than the limited ones the London Lite printed. The East London Line is the
cheapest for house prices followed by the Central Line.



Hatton Cross is of course bang slap next to Heathrow airport!


Precisely. Who would want to live there!

I can't immediately point you to anything offhand that fits the bill,
but there is a vast amount of information about house prices in the
various districts of London out there on the net. Of course as a
general rule of thumb one can expect house prices in the vicinity of
Underground stations to be higher.


As you say there's a massive volume of high price info published on a
regular basis. A few google searches for estate agent websites would
soon identify the price ranges.
--
Paul C


Admits to working for London Underground!
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Old January 16th 08, 08:19 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

In message
, at
11:26:15 on Wed, 16 Jan 2008, Mizter T remarked:
I note that the houses assessed "had to be within half a mile of the
station" - factor in a mere 10 minutes walk and the overall picture
could be quite different.


When I lived near a commuter station, just outside the M25, my rule of
thumb for house prices (of otherwise similar properties) was 2% per
minute's walk from the station. [Actually it was £1,000, but the average
prices for say a three bed semi were about £50k; probably about £300k
now].
--
Roland Perry
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Old January 16th 08, 08:29 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

On Wed, 16 Jan 2008, sweek wrote:

This appeared on the Going Underground blog:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2341/...65864844f3.jpg


For those who'd actually like to read the article:

http://london-underground.blogspot.c...-property.html

As the Circle line runs exclusively in Zone 1, I suppose I shouldn't
have been too surprised about the result. The least expensive stop on
the Circle Line is Aldgate, with average property values hovering
around £396,000.

The Victoria Line came as the next most expensive line to buy property
on, with average prices reaching £1,109,107. Green Park was most
expensive stop for property on the Victoria Line with average house
prices above £2 million. The least expensive stop was Tottenham Hale.


Like the Circle, it doesn't go that far out - the five northern and three
southern stations in marginal-to-scummy areas have eight stops in rather
nice and/or central parts of town to balance them.

The Bakerloo comes third and the H&C fourth, and those are also lines
which have smaller-than-average suburban parts, as they only protrude from
central London on one side. The same's true of the Met, of course, which
manages to be quite a bit cheaper. Are houses not that much up in the
wilds of Harrow, Northwood and Ruislip, then?

"We were somewhat surprised to find the District Line appear in the
seventh position, given it includes areas such as Fulham, Richmond and
Wimbledon and follows the Circle Line through many parts of Central
London.


It's also the East End Main Line!

The Waterloo & City Line came in at last place as there are "minimal
residential pockets" around Waterloo and Bank stations.


Minimal and cheap, presumably, which surprises me.

tom

--
It's amazing how often conversations with you have the imaginary sound
of human bones being crushed to rubble in the background. -- itchyfidget,
to snowking
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Old January 16th 08, 08:54 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

On 16 Jan, 21:12, Paul Corfield wrote:
On Wed, 16 Jan 2008 11:26:15 -0800 (PST), Mizter T
wrote:

On 16 Jan, 18:49, wrote:
I dont normally read the London Lite but an article caught my eye. There was
on an article on the average house prices around each station. The houses
had to be within half a mile of the station. Apperently Hatton Cross has the
cheapest house prices. I forget which station has the most expensive. It
would be nice to see the full list of stations and their house prices rather
than the limited ones the London Lite printed. The East London Line is the
cheapest for house prices followed by the Central Line.


Hatton Cross is of course bang slap next to Heathrow airport!


Precisely. Who would want to live there!


Deaf planespotters?
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Old January 16th 08, 10:34 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

On Wed, 16 Jan 2008 21:29:44 +0000, Tom Anderson wrote:

As the Circle line runs exclusively in Zone 1, I suppose I shouldn't
have been too surprised about the result. The least expensive stop on
the Circle Line is Aldgate, with average property values hovering
around £396,000.

The Victoria Line came as the next most expensive line to buy property
on, with average prices reaching £1,109,107. Green Park was most
expensive stop for property on the Victoria Line with average house
prices above £2 million. The least expensive stop was Tottenham Hale.


Like the Circle, it doesn't go that far out - the five northern and three
southern stations in marginal-to-scummy areas have eight stops in rather
nice and/or central parts of town to balance them.

The Bakerloo comes third and the H&C fourth, and those are also lines
which have smaller-than-average suburban parts, as they only protrude from
central London on one side. The same's true of the Met, of course, which
manages to be quite a bit cheaper. Are houses not that much up in the
wilds of Harrow, Northwood and Ruislip, then?


To my mind, the Met manages to largely avoid the less salubrious areas
of London. I think it's more that the Met is more heavily weighted
towards the outer suburbs - it has fewer stations than average in Zone
1, then skips Zones 2/3 almost completely, and has lots of stations in
Zones 5/6 and out in the sticks (a quick glance at the Tube map
suggests that perhaps a third of all Z5/6 Tube stations are on the
Met).

Meanwhile, the Bakerloo passes through some pretty scummy areas, yet
comes out near the top thanks to having plenty of stations in Z1/2 and
only one suburban branch (that only just makes it out as far as Z5).

The whole table is basically meaningless; as you suggest, it's more a
measure of how a line's stops are distributed in terms of distance
from the centre than how pleasant they are to live on. If they'd
somehow managed to factor distance out of their calculations, they
might have got more interesting results.
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Old January 16th 08, 11:05 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default 16/01/2008 - London Lite

On Wed, 16 Jan 2008, asdf wrote:

On Wed, 16 Jan 2008 21:29:44 +0000, Tom Anderson wrote:

As the Circle line runs exclusively in Zone 1, I suppose I shouldn't
have been too surprised about the result. The least expensive stop on
the Circle Line is Aldgate, with average property values hovering
around £396,000.

The Victoria Line came as the next most expensive line to buy property
on, with average prices reaching £1,109,107. Green Park was most
expensive stop for property on the Victoria Line with average house
prices above £2 million. The least expensive stop was Tottenham Hale.


Like the Circle, it doesn't go that far out - the five northern and three
southern stations in marginal-to-scummy areas have eight stops in rather
nice and/or central parts of town to balance them.

The Bakerloo comes third and the H&C fourth, and those are also lines
which have smaller-than-average suburban parts, as they only protrude from
central London on one side. The same's true of the Met, of course, which
manages to be quite a bit cheaper. Are houses not that much up in the
wilds of Harrow, Northwood and Ruislip, then?


To my mind, the Met manages to largely avoid the less salubrious areas
of London. I think it's more that the Met is more heavily weighted
towards the outer suburbs - it has fewer stations than average in Zone
1, then skips Zones 2/3 almost completely, and has lots of stations in
Zones 5/6 and out in the sticks (a quick glance at the Tube map suggests
that perhaps a third of all Z5/6 Tube stations are on the Met).


True. I'm still surprised at the implication that prices in nice parts of
Z5/6 are apparently lower than in manky parts of Z2/3.

The whole table is basically meaningless; as you suggest, it's more a
measure of how a line's stops are distributed in terms of distance from
the centre than how pleasant they are to live on. If they'd somehow
managed to factor distance out of their calculations, they might have
got more interesting results.


They could break it down by zone, and have separate bar-charts for each.
Or how about some kind of crazy pie-chart, like a dartboard, with each
sector allocated to a line, in roughly the order they head out of London,
each ring corresponding to a zone, and then the height of a 3D tower
rising from each block corresponding to the price?

tom

PS what do you call the subdivision of a circle that's the part of a
sector between two concentric circles? I'm calling it a block because of
hard disks, but it must have a proper name.

--
Dude, read Aquinas if you want intelligent. This is the internet.


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