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Old October 28th 17, 04:18 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

It seems Harry Beck didn't confine himself to designing non-geographic Tube
maps. I came across this Imperial Airlines air route map he created in
1935:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DNOBfs-W0AA3KJm.jpg:large

Air routes were rather infrequent back then, and Beck came up with a rather
complicated way of showing weekly, twice-weekly, etc frequencies. It seems
that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more open about
code-shared flights than they are today.

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Old October 28th 17, 06:56 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map


"Recliner" wrote in message
...
It seems Harry Beck didn't confine himself to designing non-geographic
Tube
maps. I came across this Imperial Airlines air route map he created in
1935:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DNOBfs-W0AA3KJm.jpg:large

Air routes were rather infrequent back then, and Beck came up with a
rather
complicated way of showing weekly, twice-weekly, etc frequencies. It seems
that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more open about
code-shared flights than they are today.


Excellent! I'd like to see a higher-res version. Have you the path that
might include it?

PA


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Old October 28th 17, 07:14 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

In message , at 15:18:36 on Sat, 28 Oct
2017, Recliner remarked:

It seems that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more
open about code-shared flights than they are today.


https://www.flightstats.com is pretty transparent about codeshares. It
even tells you which company operates the flight (rather than markets
it).

eg: "Operated by (YV) Mesa Airlines on behalf of (AA) American Airlines,
a codeshare flight by the following airlines:
(GF) Gulf Air, (AS) Alaska Airlines, (BA) British Airways"
--
Roland Perry
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Old October 28th 17, 08:06 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:18:36 on Sat, 28 Oct
2017, Recliner remarked:

It seems that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more
open about code-shared flights than they are today.


https://www.flightstats.com is pretty transparent about codeshares. It
even tells you which company operates the flight (rather than markets
it).

eg: "Operated by (YV) Mesa Airlines on behalf of (AA) American Airlines,
a codeshare flight by the following airlines:
(GF) Gulf Air, (AS) Alaska Airlines, (BA) British Airways"


Yes, you can usually find out, and sometimes the flight number gives it
away, but many pax are still surprised to discover whose metal they'll be
flying on.

Many years ago, I was amused when travelling from Quebec City to Ottawa,
that our small Beechcraft 1900 operated by a tiny local line, on behalf of
Canadian Airlines, was announced as a BA flight.
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Old October 28th 17, 08:21 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

Peter Able wrote:

"Recliner" wrote in message
...
It seems Harry Beck didn't confine himself to designing non-geographic
Tube
maps. I came across this Imperial Airlines air route map he created in
1935:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DNOBfs-W0AA3KJm.jpg:large

Air routes were rather infrequent back then, and Beck came up with a
rather
complicated way of showing weekly, twice-weekly, etc frequencies. It seems
that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more open about
code-shared flights than they are today.


Excellent! I'd like to see a higher-res version. Have you the path that
might include it?


Here's another variant. I can't see Beck's name on it, but the schematic
map is certainly in his style:
https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~267441~90041892:Imperial-Airways-Map-of-Empire-&-Eu



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Old October 28th 17, 08:24 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

In message
-septe
mber.org, at 19:06:49 on Sat, 28 Oct 2017, Recliner
remarked:

It seems that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more
open about code-shared flights than they are today.


https://www.flightstats.com is pretty transparent about codeshares. It
even tells you which company operates the flight (rather than markets
it).

eg: "Operated by (YV) Mesa Airlines on behalf of (AA) American Airlines,
a codeshare flight by the following airlines:
(GF) Gulf Air, (AS) Alaska Airlines, (BA) British Airways"


Yes, you can usually find out, and sometimes the flight number gives it
away, but


The main issue I've had reported to me (Virgin codeshare, at Gatwick
again) is which desk to check in at when the operator and codeshare are
in different terminals.

many pax are still surprised to discover whose metal they'll be
flying on.


More recently on a Delta flight to the USA which turned out to be
operated by AF.

However, the shorter the flight number, the more likely it's not a
codeshare from someone else.
--
Roland Perry
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Old October 28th 17, 08:49 PM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

Roland Perry wrote:
In message
-septe
mber.org, at 19:06:49 on Sat, 28 Oct 2017, Recliner
remarked:

It seems that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more
open about code-shared flights than they are today.

https://www.flightstats.com is pretty transparent about codeshares. It
even tells you which company operates the flight (rather than markets
it).

eg: "Operated by (YV) Mesa Airlines on behalf of (AA) American Airlines,
a codeshare flight by the following airlines:
(GF) Gulf Air, (AS) Alaska Airlines, (BA) British Airways"


Yes, you can usually find out, and sometimes the flight number gives it
away, but


The main issue I've had reported to me (Virgin codeshare, at Gatwick
again) is which desk to check in at when the operator and codeshare are
in different terminals.


Yes, that can be very confusing.


many pax are still surprised to discover whose metal they'll be
flying on.


More recently on a Delta flight to the USA which turned out to be
operated by AF.

However, the shorter the flight number, the more likely it's not a
codeshare from someone else.


Yes, four digit flight numbers are a clue it's a code-share.

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Old October 30th 17, 09:07 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map


"Recliner" wrote in message
...
Peter Able wrote:

"Recliner" wrote in message
...
It seems Harry Beck didn't confine himself to designing non-geographic
Tube
maps. I came across this Imperial Airlines air route map he created in
1935:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DNOBfs-W0AA3KJm.jpg:large

Air routes were rather infrequent back then, and Beck came up with a
rather
complicated way of showing weekly, twice-weekly, etc frequencies. It
seems
that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more open about
code-shared flights than they are today.


Excellent! I'd like to see a higher-res version. Have you the path that
might include it?


Here's another variant. I can't see Beck's name on it, but the schematic
map is certainly in his style:
https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~267441~90041892:Imperial-Airways-Map-of-Empire-&-Eu


Yes, I came across that, apparent, plagiarism of Beck's efforts. No sign of
a higher res vesion of Beck's original, though. Twitter seems to accept
small and orig in place of the term large in the URL, but in this case,
whilst the smaller version is smaller, the orig version is the same size as
the large one :-{{

Cheers,

PA


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Old October 30th 17, 10:50 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

Not one of his best efforts, it seems to me.

The flights of associated companies being shown in black are much more prominent in the diagram than those of Imperial Airways, shown in a rather weedy reddish. Or perhaps they just faded?

Then the daily flights between, I assume, important routes are shown in a rather inconspicuous way with dashed lines, whereas the less frequent routes have solid colour. It's impossible to guess, without looking at the key, which routes have the greater frequencies. I'd have thought it would be a rather basic precept of graphic design to have prominence of the line proportion to service frequency, or at least proportional to something useful. And the representations of summer-only and winter-only seem to have no connection to each other.

Maybe this was a draft and he did a better one later?


On 28/10/2017 16:18, Recliner wrote:
It seems Harry Beck didn't confine himself to designing non-geographic Tube
maps. I came across this Imperial Airlines air route map he created in
1935:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DNOBfs-W0AA3KJm.jpg:large

Air routes were rather infrequent back then, and Beck came up with a rather
complicated way of showing weekly, twice-weekly, etc frequencies. It seems
that even back then, airlines had alliances, but were more open about
code-shared flights than they are today.


--
Clive Page
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Old October 30th 17, 10:53 AM posted to uk.transport.london
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Default Beck's air map

In message , at 09:07:54 on Mon, 30 Oct
2017, Peter Able remarked:
Here's another variant. I can't see Beck's name on it, but the schematic
map is certainly in his style:
https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~267441~90041892:Imperial-Airways-Map-of-Empire-&-Eu


Yes, I came across that, apparent, plagiarism of Beck's efforts.


"This extraordinary world map by noted Bauhaus designer and artist,
Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, draws on the pioneering information design work of
Harry Beck and his London subway maps"
--
Roland Perry


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