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  #101   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 02:42 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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In message , at 15:34:28 on Wed, 6 Jan 2021,
Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 10:00, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:31:21 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021, Sam Wilson remarked:

On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on initials
but they
were at least 3 characters long.* People without a middle name got
an “x”
inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”.** It looked odd
when you first
saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was Xavier...”


There's still some cachet in having an ongoing login with "1" as a
suffix in Cambridge. Maybe other places too.


Especially one of the original four-character logins (RXP1, etc.)


Yes, those are the ones I meant. Have they got a new scheme now, rather
than issuing RXP1234?
--
Roland Perry

  #102   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 04:21 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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On 06/01/2021 15:42, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:34:28 on Wed, 6 Jan 2021,
Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 10:00, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:31:21 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021,* Sam Wilson remarked:

On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on initials
but* they
were at least 3 characters long.* People without a middle name got
an “x”
inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”.** It looked odd when
you* first
saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was Xavier...”


*There's still some cachet in having an ongoing login with "1" as a
suffix in Cambridge. Maybe other places too.


Especially one of the original four-character logins (RXP1, etc.)


Yes, those are the ones I meant. Have they got a new scheme now, rather
than issuing RXP1234?


I've been out of touch for a while but I think they use the same scheme
with five characters, so my example would be the less prestigious RXP10.
  #103   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 04:49 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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On 05/01/2021 22:49, Charles Ellson wrote:
On Tue, 5 Jan 2021 21:20:09 -0000, "NY" wrote:

"Tweed" wrote in message
...

It's just a cultural thing, like many Europeans have names like Magnus
Magnus*son*, and innumerable similar Slavic suffices.

Slavic? I thought it came from the Icelandic. There surnames come from the
first name of the parent.
So Magnusson is the male offspring of a chap whose first name was Magnus
something elseson. If he also had a female offspring her surname would
be
Magnusdottir. (Magnus’s daughter)

It made for an interesting telephone book....


It must make genealogy "interesting" because every generation of a family
will have a different surname, as will brothers and sisters.

In Icelandic, do *both* the sons and the daughters take the father's first
name? I have vague memories of being told that daughter's sometimes take the
mother's first name - so Magnus and Oddny (*) might have a son with a
surname Magnusson and a daughter with a surname Oddnydottir (rather than
Magnusdottir).

Do Icelandic women generally take their husband's surname after marriage or
do they normally / always keep their maiden surname?


(*) The only Icelandic person I knew was a woman with this rather unusual (I
hesitate to say Odd!) first name.

You will also find patronymics in very old Welsh and Scottish records,
usually where the names have been given in Welsh or Gaelic.


Some modern Welsh have revived that tradition, calling themselves Owen
ap Rhys rather than Owen Smith.

--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.

  #104   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 05:15 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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In message , at 17:21:52 on Wed, 6 Jan 2021,
Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 15:42, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:34:28 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021, Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 10:00, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:31:21 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021,* Sam Wilson remarked:

On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on
initials but* they
were at least 3 characters long.* People without a middle name
an “x”
inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”.** It looked odd
when you* first
saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was Xavier...”


*There's still some cachet in having an ongoing login with "1" as
suffix in Cambridge. Maybe other places too.

Especially one of the original four-character logins (RXP1, etc.)

Yes, those are the ones I meant. Have they got a new scheme now,
rather than issuing RXP1234?


I've been out of touch for a while but I think they use the same scheme
with five characters, so my example would be the less prestigious RXP10.


Not RXP01?
--
Roland Perry
  #105   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 05:34 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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On 06/01/2021 18:15, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 17:21:52 on Wed, 6 Jan 2021,
Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 15:42, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:34:28 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021,* Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 10:00, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:31:21 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021,* Sam Wilson remarked:

On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on initials
but* they
were at least 3 characters long.* People without a middle name an “x”
inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”.** It looked odd when
you* first
saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was Xavier...”

*There's still some cachet in having an ongoing login with "1" as
suffix in Cambridge. Maybe other places too.

Especially one of the original four-character logins (RXP1, etc.)
*Yes, those are the ones I meant. Have they got a new scheme now,
rather* than issuing RXP1234?


I've been out of touch for a while but I think they use the same scheme
with five characters, so my example would be the less prestigious RXP10.


Not RXP01?


In four-character days, the suffix for those with no middle initial
started at 10. My uninformed guess is that this system continues.


  #106   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 05:44 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2021 09:31:21 +0000, Sam Wilson wrote:
On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on initials but
they were at least 3 characters long. People without a middle name got
an “x” inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”. It looked odd
when you first saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was
Xavier...”


According to DVLA, my middle initial is "9". Yes, the number nine. Driver
numbers are based on your surname plus first and middle initials, but if
you don't have a middle name you get a "9" instead.

Mike


  #107   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 06:11 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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In message , at 18:34:23 on Wed, 6 Jan 2021,
Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 18:15, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 17:21:52 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021, Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 15:42, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:34:28 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021,* Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 10:00, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:31:21 on Wed, 6
Jan 2021,* Sam Wilson remarked:

On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on
initials but* they
were at least 3 characters long.* People without a middle name

inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”.** It looked
odd when you* first
saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was Xavier...”

*There's still some cachet in having an ongoing login with "1"
suffix in Cambridge. Maybe other places too.

Especially one of the original four-character logins (RXP1, etc.)
*Yes, those are the ones I meant. Have they got a new scheme now,
rather* than issuing RXP1234?

I've been out of touch for a while but I think they use the same scheme
with five characters, so my example would be the less prestigious RXP10.


Not RXP01?


In four-character days, the suffix for those with no middle initial
started at 10. My uninformed guess is that this system continues.


But that would be RP10, or even RP01.
--
Roland Perry
  #108   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 06:22 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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Posts: 498
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On Wed, 6 Jan 2021 17:49:14 +0000, Graeme Wall
wrote:

On 05/01/2021 22:49, Charles Ellson wrote:
On Tue, 5 Jan 2021 21:20:09 -0000, "NY" wrote:

"Tweed" wrote in message
...

It's just a cultural thing, like many Europeans have names like Magnus
Magnus*son*, and innumerable similar Slavic suffices.

Slavic? I thought it came from the Icelandic. There surnames come from the
first name of the parent.
So Magnusson is the male offspring of a chap whose first name was Magnus
something elseson. If he also had a female offspring her surname would
be
Magnusdottir. (Magnuss daughter)

It made for an interesting telephone book....

It must make genealogy "interesting" because every generation of a family
will have a different surname, as will brothers and sisters.

In Icelandic, do *both* the sons and the daughters take the father's first
name? I have vague memories of being told that daughter's sometimes take the
mother's first name - so Magnus and Oddny (*) might have a son with a
surname Magnusson and a daughter with a surname Oddnydottir (rather than
Magnusdottir).

Do Icelandic women generally take their husband's surname after marriage or
do they normally / always keep their maiden surname?


(*) The only Icelandic person I knew was a woman with this rather unusual (I
hesitate to say Odd!) first name.

You will also find patronymics in very old Welsh and Scottish records,
usually where the names have been given in Welsh or Gaelic.


Some modern Welsh have revived that tradition, calling themselves Owen
ap Rhys rather than Owen Smith.

At least he hasn't gone the whole hog (yet) and gone back four or five
generations as some of the old records do.

Tearlach mhic Desmond mhic Percy mhic Tearlach mhic Esaph mhic
Uilleum.....
  #109   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 06:29 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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Posts: 10,125
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In message , at 19:11:58 on Wed, 6 Jan 2021,
Roland Perry remarked:
In message , at 18:34:23 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021, Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 18:15, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 17:21:52 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021, Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 15:42, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 15:34:28 on Wed, 6 Jan
2021,* Certes remarked:
On 06/01/2021 10:00, Roland Perry wrote:
In message , at 09:31:21 on Wed, 6
Jan 2021,* Sam Wilson remarked:

On of the UoEd’s schools used to use login names based on
initials but* they
were at least 3 characters long.* People without a middle name
inserted, so S.... W.... (not me) was “sxw”.** It looked
odd when you* first
saw one - “oh, I didn’t know Steve’s middle name was Xavier...”

*There's still some cachet in having an ongoing login with "1"
suffix in Cambridge. Maybe other places too.

Especially one of the original four-character logins (RXP1, etc.)
*Yes, those are the ones I meant. Have they got a new scheme now,
rather* than issuing RXP1234?

I've been out of touch for a while but I think they use the same scheme
with five characters, so my example would be the less prestigious RXP10.


Not RXP01?


In four-character days, the suffix for those with no middle initial
started at 10. My uninformed guess is that this system continues.


But that would be RP10, or even RP01.


Getting back to the middle initial thing, my old boss was always known
as AMS[1], and his car was AMS 1; and even before I worked there, I
always wanted RPA 1, but it wasn't available (RPA being my nickname at
school, being the first three of my initials).

As for email addresses, despite having clocked up a hundred or more over
the years, I've always assiduously avoided any with a numerical suffix.

Looking at my address book, the closest was
, which I never used, closed in 2003,
and combined my postcode and phone number which was supposed to help
*me* remember it, not anyone else.

[1] ...trading
--
Roland Perry
  #110   Report Post  
Old January 6th 21, 09:14 PM posted to uk.railway,uk.transport.london
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On 5 Jan 2021 at 21:20:09 GMT, ""NY"" wrote:

"Tweed" wrote in message
...

It's just a cultural thing, like many Europeans have names like Magnus
Magnus*son*, and innumerable similar Slavic suffices.


Slavic? I thought it came from the Icelandic. There surnames come from the
first name of the parent.
So Magnusson is the male offspring of a chap whose first name was Magnus
something elseson. If he also had a female offspring her surname would
be
Magnusdottir. (Magnus’s daughter)

It made for an interesting telephone book....


It must make genealogy "interesting" because every generation of a family
will have a different surname, as will brothers and sisters.

In Icelandic, do *both* the sons and the daughters take the father's first
name? I have vague memories of being told that daughter's sometimes take the
mother's first name - so Magnus and Oddny (*) might have a son with a
surname Magnusson and a daughter with a surname Oddnydottir (rather than
Magnusdottir).

Do Icelandic women generally take their husband's surname after marriage or
do they normally / always keep their maiden surname?


(*) The only Icelandic person I knew was a woman with this rather unusual (I
hesitate to say Odd!) first name.


In the back of my mind I seem to recall that our word 'odd' is derived from
Old Norse when it meant 'pointed' or 'sharp' or similar.

In the course of time the meaning drifted so it meant something which 'stood
out' from the normal, that is it was 'exceptional'. Hence 'Odin' and similar.
I suspect the Icelandic meaning is closer to the Old Norse than to ours.
--
Robert




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